Concussions Media Briefing - Highlights

Selected clips from SciLine’s media briefing on October 11, 2018. (Back to main briefing page)

 

Dr. Ann McKee, Boston University School of Medicine and VA Boston Healthcare

Currently, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) can only be diagnosed after death, by analyzing post-mortem brain specimens. There is still no way to diagnose the disease in living people. Here, Dr. Ann McKee answers the question: "What will it take to develop a diagnostic test for CTE?"

Dr. Angela Colantonio, Rehabilitation Sciences Institute at the University of Toronto

On an activity-by-activity basis, females generally suffer concussions at a higher rate than men, report more-severe symptoms, and experience slower recovery. Here, Dr. Angela Colantonio explains what scientists are uncovering about the possible drivers of these gender-based differences.

Dr. Andrew Peterson, University of Iowa

Various efforts are underway to engineer new models of athletic helmets and mouthpieces that could help signal or protect against head trauma. Here, Dr. Andrew Peterson, team physician for the Iowa Hawkeyes football team, answers: "Do helmets protect against concussions?"